Tony Edel at The Houston-Taylor Group. Your Insurance Broker since 1999
Multiple Carriers That Compete in Today's Marketplace
HomeInsurance Quote YourselfClaims Phone NumbersHelpful InfoInsurance CompaniesMexico Insurance QuotingSite MapAbout MeContact UsPrivacy Notice
Auto Info
Home Info
Home Ins Tips
Business Info
Commercial Auto Info
Useful Links
Health Ins Info
Health Reform:
Patient Protection & Affordability Act
Health Reform Bill
Part D Drug Benefit

Home Info

 

Homeowner's Insurance Explained

 

What is in a standard homeowners insurance policy?

A standard homeowners insurance policy includes four essential types of coverage. They include:

1. Coverage for the structure of your home.
2. Coverage for your personal belongings.
3. Liability protection.
4. Additional living expenses in the event you are temporarily unable to live in your home because of a fire or other insured disaster.

1. The structure of your house

This part of your policy pays to repair or rebuild your home if it is damaged or destroyed by fire, hurricane, hail, lightning or other disaster listed in your policy. It will not pay for damage caused by a flood, earthquake or routine wear and tear. When purchasing coverage for the structure of your home, it is important to buy enough to rebuild your home.

Most standard policies also cover structures that are detached from your home such as a garage, tool shed or gazebo. Generally, these structures are covered for about 10% of the amount of insurance you have on the structure of your home. If you need more coverage, talk to your insurance agent about purchasing more insurance.

 2. Your personal belongings

Your furniture, clothes, sports equipment and other personal items are covered if they are stolen or destroyed by fire, hurricane or other insured disaster. Most companies provide coverage for 50% to 70% of the amount of insurance you have on the structure of your home. So if you have $100,000 worth of insurance on the structure of your home, you would have between $50,000 to $70,000 worth of coverage for your belongings. The best way to determine if this is enough coverage is to conduct a home inventory.

This part of your policy includes off-premises coverage. This means that your belongings are covered anywhere in the world, unless you have decided against off-premises coverage. Some companies limit the amount to 10% of the amount of insurance you have for your possessions. You have up to $500 of coverage for unauthorized use of your credit cards.

Expensive items like jewelry, furs and silverware are covered, but there are usually dollar limits if they are stolen. Generally, you are covered for between $1,000 to $2,000 for all of your jewelry and furs. To insure these items to their full value, purchase a special personal property endorsement or floater and insure the item for it's appraised value. Coverage includes “accidental disappearance,” meaning coverage if you simply lose that item. And there is no deductible.

Trees, plants and shrubs are also covered under standard homeowners insurance. Generally you are covered for 5% of the insurance on the house—up to about $500 per item. Perils covered are theft, fire, lightning, explosion, vandalism, riot and even falling aircraft. They are not covered for damage by wind or disease.

3. Liability protection

Liability covers you against lawsuits for bodily injury or property damage that you or family members cause to other people. It also pays for damage caused by your pets. So, if your son, daughter or dog accidentally ruins your neighbor’s expensive rug, you are covered. However, if they destroy your rug, you are not covered.

The liability portion of your policy pays for both the cost of defending you in court and any court awards—up to the limit of your policy. You are also covered not just in your home, but anywhere in the world.

Liability limits generally start at about $100,000. However, experts recommend that you purchase at least $300,000 worth of protection. Some people feel more comfortable with even more coverage. According to Charles Schwab OnInvesting "consider having at least enough coverage to match your personal net worth".

Ever gotten into an argument with someone and called them something in public not exactly suitable for printing? What about the neighborhood rumor mill, ever passed along a juicy piece of information without first checking the facts? These are examples of "personal injury" as defined in insurance terms. Libel, slander and defamation of character are the best known of the "personal injury" offenses.

The Internet has upped the ante on the need for personal injury protection. Posting an opinion to a website, blogging about an individual or business or simply forwarding a damaging email could result in a personal injury suit. The problem is personal injury is not covered in the unendorsed homeowners' policy. An endorsement is required to gain the needed protection.
Personal injury protection is garnered by attachment of the HO 24 82 (or equivalent state-specific or proprietary) endorsement. Coverage is not limited to libel, slander and defamation of character, but is also extended to any offense commonly considered personal injury (in insurance terms) including: invasion of privacy, wrongful entry into or wrongful eviction from a premises (all three could be useful if the insured is a lessor or landlord), false arrest, false imprisonment or malicious prosecution.

You can purchase an Umbrella or Excess Liability policy which provides broader coverage, including claims against you for libel and slander, as well as higher liability limits. Generally, umbrella policies cost between $200 to $350 for $1 million of additional liability protection. For protection related to business exposures such as self-employed lawyer, accountant, consider a Commercial Umbrella and Professional Liability.

Your policy also provides no-fault medical coverage. In the event a friend or neighbor is injured in your home, he or she can simply submit medical bills to your insurance company. This way, expenses are paid without a liability claim being filed against you. You can generally get $1,000 to $5,000 worth of this coverage. It does not, however, pay the medical bills for your family or your pet.


4. Additional living expenses


This pays the additional costs of living away from home if you can't live there due to damage from a fire, storm or other insured disaster. It covers hotel bills, restaurant meals and other living expenses incurred while your home is being rebuilt. Coverage for additional living expenses differs from company to company. Many policies provide coverage for about 20% of the insurance on your house. You can increase this coverage, however, for an additional premium. Some companies sell a policy that provides an unlimited amount of loss-of-use coverage, but for a limited amount of time.

If you rent out part of your house, this coverage also reimburses you for the rent that you would have collected from your tenant if your home had not been destroyed.


HomeInsurance Quote YourselfClaims Phone NumbersHelpful InfoInsurance CompaniesMexico Insurance QuotingSite MapAbout MeContact UsPrivacy Notice